Can allergy medicine increase blood pressure?

Asked By: Mona Nikolaus
Date created: Mon, Mar 29, 2021 11:37 AM
Best answers
They may raise your blood pressure. They also keep some high blood pressure drugs from working the way they should.Be careful, because many allergy medications contain antihistamines and a...
Answered By: Eldon Wintheiser
Date created: Mon, Mar 29, 2021 8:36 PM
Although allergies don't usually directly increase blood pressure, they can contribute indirectly to high blood pressure in two very different ways. Decongestants commonly used by people with allergies, such as pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Actifed, others) and phenylephrine (Sudafed PE), constrict small blood vessels in the nose.
Answered By: Edgardo Bailey
Date created: Tue, Mar 30, 2021 7:47 AM
Allergies generally don’t directly affect blood pressure, although congestion can cause or worsen sleep apnea, which can increase hypertension. ( Learn More ) Before starting any medication, including allergy medication, it’s a good idea to talk with your doctor about your symptoms and concerns, particularly if you have a known history of high blood pressure.
Answered By: Astrid Smith
Date created: Wed, Mar 31, 2021 7:38 AM
Can Allergy Medications Increase Blood Pressure? Although allergies don't usually directly increase blood pressure, they can indirectly contribute to high blood pressure. When you choose to use decongestants, such as pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Actifed, others)and phenylephrine (Sudafed PE), you can worsen the existing high blood pressure.
Answered By: Mireille Boyer
Date created: Thu, Apr 1, 2021 2:18 PM
Although some allergy medicines affect your blood pressure or interact with your blood pressure medication, safe options for treating your allergy symptoms exist if you have high blood pressure. Second-generation antihistamines that are not combined with decongestants are generally safe to use if you are not taking the blood pressure medicines listed in the drug interaction section above.
Answered By: Moises Schiller
Date created: Thu, Apr 1, 2021 6:12 PM
Medical Perspectives. Allergies do not directly cause high blood pressure, but can be an indirect factor due to inflammation. High blood pressure can lead to a number of serious health concerns, like heart disease, which is why it is important to understand how allergies can lead to high blood pressure.
Answered By: Neal Collier
Date created: Sat, Apr 3, 2021 11:55 AM
FRIDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are warning people who take certain drugs for high blood pressure to watch out for a rare but sometimes serious side effect. Patients who take ACE...
Answered By: Rick Zboncak
Date created: Sat, Apr 3, 2021 8:33 PM
Patients can select from prescription and over-the-counter drugs that won’t interfere with their heart medications or overwhelm their dosing schedules. While some allergy medicines pose risks to people with heart problems, several classes of drugs offer relief and will not raise blood pressure.
Answered By: Elton Lind
Date created: Mon, Apr 5, 2021 10:37 AM
While many allergy medicines do not affect a person's blood pressure, there are some that can, and are especially dangerous for those who have a history of high blood pressure 3. One must be cautious, as several of these medicines are available over the counter. Generally, types of antihistamines and corticosteroids are the best allergy medicines to take for high blood pressure 3.
Answered By: Kennedi Greenfelder
Date created: Tue, Apr 6, 2021 4:22 AM

Does allergy medicine raise blood pressure?

  • Although allergies don't usually directly increase blood pressure, they can contribute indirectly to high blood pressure in two very different ways. Decongestants commonly used by people with allergies, such as pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Actifed, others) and phenylephrine (Sudafed PE), constrict small blood vessels in the nose.
Answered By: Shanel Pouros
Date created: Tue, Apr 6, 2021 7:49 AM
FAQ
The FDA doesn’t recommend over-the-counter (OTC) medicines for cough and cold symptoms in children younger than 2 years old. Prescription cough medicines containing codeine or hydrocodone are not...
It may be fine to take an allergy medication that's a month past its expiration date. But there is some risk in taking a heart rhythm medication that, if ineffective, could lead to an unstable and dangerous heart problem. And a medication that's a month past its expiration date may be potent while one that's 5 years past is not.
The FDA doesn’t recommend over-the-counter (OTC) medicines for cough and cold symptoms in children younger than 2 years old. Prescription cough medicines containing codeine or hydrocodone are not...
You can travel with your medication in both carry-on and checked baggage. It’s highly recommended you place these items in your carry-on in the event that you need immediate access. TSA does not require passengers to have medications in prescription bottles, but states have individual laws regarding the labeling of prescription medication with which passengers need to comply.
The doctor recommends Mucinex to patients as the best overall product for sore throats while relieving other symptoms that might accompany the pain. As a body expectorant, the medication works to thin out the secretion that often collects in the throat and causes inflammation and pain.
You can bring your medication in pill or solid form in unlimited amounts as long as it is screened. You can travel with your medication in both carry-on and checked baggage. It’s highly recommended you place these items in your carry-on in the event that you need immediate access.
You can travel with your medication in both carry-on and checked baggage. It’s highly recommended you place these items in your carry-on in the event that you need immediate access. TSA does not require passengers to have medications in prescription bottles, but states have individual laws regarding the labeling of prescription medication with which passengers need to comply.
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