I’m pregnant. is it safe to take medicine?

Asked By: Rubye Bashirian
Date created: Wed, Mar 31, 2021 12:28 AM
Best answers
Only a small percentage of medicines — fewer than 10 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) — have been proven to be safe for pregnant women to take during pregnancy. Even over-the-counter (OTC) medications, such as those used to treat coughs, colds, diarrhea and nausea, can pose risks to your unborn child.
Answered By: Eda Walker
Date created: Thu, Apr 1, 2021 1:02 AM
When you’re pregnant, we may be willing to accept a medication that is slightly less effective but safer for you and your baby. My advice: Temper your response if you become pregnant while you’re on a prescription medication, especially if it’s for high blood pressure , diabetes , seizures , or depression .
Answered By: Elvie Treutel
Date created: Thu, Apr 1, 2021 3:06 PM
There may come a time during your pregnancy when you’re feeling under the weather and aren't sure if you can take your regular over-the-counter (OTC) medication. Some medications are safe to ...
Answered By: Reta Crist
Date created: Thu, Apr 1, 2021 7:31 PM
On occasion it may be medically necessary to do so. Fortunately, there are many medications that are safe during pregnancy. At SSM Health, we encourage you to speak with your doctor before taking any drugs and only use medications as directed. If you are unsure about a particular medication, speak with your doctor.
Answered By: Isabella Christiansen
Date created: Fri, Apr 2, 2021 5:30 AM
If you're planning on becoming pregnant and you are taking multiple medications, your physician will want to try to get your seizures under control with a single drug. That's because the risk of birth defects is greater when women are on more than one medication. Several medications do look better in research on animals.
Answered By: Ericka Hudson
Date created: Fri, Apr 2, 2021 6:56 PM
The simple answer is: yes. You should ask your doctor before you take any medication, even if it’s just an over-the-counter pill designed to relieve pain. Such medicine may seem harmless enough,...
Answered By: Adolphus Hirthe
Date created: Sun, Apr 4, 2021 5:28 PM
Yes, it's safe. In fact, it's unsafe not to take thyroid medication during pregnancy if you need it. Whether you have hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid) or the much less common hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid), you'll probably need to take medication and be closely monitored.
Answered By: Kay Hyatt
Date created: Mon, Apr 5, 2021 2:12 PM
Remember that no drug is 100 percent safe for all women, so it's a good idea to check with your doctor or midwife before taking any kind of medicine during pregnancy. Don't take more than the recommended dose and, if possible, avoid taking anything during your first trimester, when your developing baby is most vulnerable.
Answered By: Alexzander Hill
Date created: Tue, Apr 6, 2021 6:33 PM
And she gave me a response that I have heard over and over since: “If you’re going to get pregnant, you should go off of your medication. It’s not safe to be pregnant while taking antidepressants.”...
Answered By: Kamille Wintheiser
Date created: Thu, Apr 8, 2021 6:23 AM
FAQ
The FDA doesn’t recommend over-the-counter (OTC) medicines for cough and cold symptoms in children younger than 2 years old. Prescription cough medicines containing codeine or hydrocodone are not...
It may be fine to take an allergy medication that's a month past its expiration date. But there is some risk in taking a heart rhythm medication that, if ineffective, could lead to an unstable and dangerous heart problem. And a medication that's a month past its expiration date may be potent while one that's 5 years past is not.
The FDA doesn’t recommend over-the-counter (OTC) medicines for cough and cold symptoms in children younger than 2 years old. Prescription cough medicines containing codeine or hydrocodone are not...
You can travel with your medication in both carry-on and checked baggage. It’s highly recommended you place these items in your carry-on in the event that you need immediate access. TSA does not require passengers to have medications in prescription bottles, but states have individual laws regarding the labeling of prescription medication with which passengers need to comply.
The doctor recommends Mucinex to patients as the best overall product for sore throats while relieving other symptoms that might accompany the pain. As a body expectorant, the medication works to thin out the secretion that often collects in the throat and causes inflammation and pain.
You can bring your medication in pill or solid form in unlimited amounts as long as it is screened. You can travel with your medication in both carry-on and checked baggage. It’s highly recommended you place these items in your carry-on in the event that you need immediate access.
You can travel with your medication in both carry-on and checked baggage. It’s highly recommended you place these items in your carry-on in the event that you need immediate access. TSA does not require passengers to have medications in prescription bottles, but states have individual laws regarding the labeling of prescription medication with which passengers need to comply.
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